VR and Hotel Bookings – How does it work?

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People always look at the ‘Rooms’ page of a website before they book. That’s why these are the most valuable pages on a hotel’s website.

“So, if you’re able to lift your images from the standard, 2-D experience, into an immersive VR experience,” says Michal Hubschmann, founder of VDroom, “you’re keeping people on your website longer, which creates a stronger emotional attachment to your property, leading to more direct bookings.”

This is what the A23 Hotel discovered, recently, when they added a VR subdomain to their website.

Traffic to their website increased by 108% (adding more than 2,500 unique visitors), their Google ranking dramatically improved, and people are spending over 4 minutes, on average, virtually touring their property.

This has resulted in more direct bookings and higher RevPAR. These results are understandable for several reasons:

1. Hardly anyone, these days, books a hotel room without first looking at reviews on TripAdvisor to get feeling for what a hotel is really like.

“So, why rely on reviews to speak for your hotel,” Michal asks, “when you can show people the unvarnished truth of your property by letting them experience it for themselves?”

This, she says, is how you can be open and honest when setting expectations. And when you do that well, guests know exactly what they’re going to experience, so they’re much more likely to choose you over one of your competitors.

And, 2. Although VR is still in its infancy, big players like Google, Facebook, and even Airbnb, have all jumped on the bandwagon, making a big push to promote this kind of content. So, people are quickly waking up to the fact that VR makes their travel planning easier and more enjoyable.

Because of this, big hotel brands, such as; Ibis, Mercure, Radisson, Wyndham, Best Western and Days Inn have all signed with VDroom, recently, adding a VR subdomain to their websites to help them capture the attention of this ever-expanding user group.